Black Women Who Broke Through on Election Night

Despite the presidential election results, Black women knocked down doors in several areas of the country at the polls.

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Black Women’s Political Leadership by the Numbers

Last year, we saw the largest number of Black women running for public office at the state-wide and federal levels. In all, more than 100 Black candidates campaigned for these elected positions. Twenty-five African Americans—10 of them women—sought statewide office in 2014, compared to 17 in 2002, which held the previous record for Black candidates seeking statewide office in a general election.

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28 Days of HerStory

Black History Month is always an exciting time because of the knowledge I gain throughout the 28 days. Each year, I gain a renewed respect for those Black women who have paved the way for my generation and it is up to us to keep their legacy alive.

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12 Days of Political Empowerment

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Ain’t I a Citizen?

By Arielle K. Andrews

The importance of being engaged in politics was instilled in me at a very young age. When I was two years-old, my parents had me reciting the presidential cabinet to anyone that would listen. “Madeweine Albwight,” I would say, it was close enough. By the age of ten, I knew every president in order, and the years that they served in office; I still do. Needless to say, once I turned 18, I was eager to finally make my opinion count and my voice heard by voting at the polls for local and national elections. As a black person and a woman, I see voting as a responsibility made possible only by the many men and women who came before me that were willing to die for the cause. The right to vote was out of reach for minority citizens for so many years that the ramifications of this oppression are still prevalent in debates over “The Voting Rights Act” in southern states such as North Carolina. Voting is a civic duty that should not be taken lightly. People risked their lives for this opportunity to choose, yet many constituents today aren’t even willing to sacrifice the time or gas money it takes to exercise their right to vote. What would Sojourner Truth say?

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